Dr Challinor is a Researcher and Lecturer of Psychology at the Australian Catholic University at the Strathfield Campus in Sydney, Australia

Dr Challinor's research programme falls into two streams covering the overlapping disciplines of neuroscience and cognition: 

Neuroscience projects: which seek to further describe and understand the neural mechanisms by which we perceive and engage with our world. For example: 

-Vision Science Projects 

-Music therapy for people living with Dementia 

Cognition projects: Investigating how we think and learn. For example, attitudes towards autonomous vehicles in the event of a crash. Dr Challinor’s research into education aims to increase skills and knowledge in evidence based areas using innovative learning and teaching methods for statistics and research methods. 

 

Her teaching covers the areas of Perception, Cognition and Behavioural Neuropsychology. In 2020 Dr Challinor supervises 3 Honours, 4 Masters students and 1 PhD student. Since 2013 Kirsten has taken about 18 months total maternity leave from academia to be the primary carer of her 2 children. Her "return-to-work" during this period has mostly been on a part-time basis varying between 1 to 3 days per week. In 2020 Kirsten works as an academic on a 60% full time basis. She is an Honorary Associate in Psychology Macquarie University and a Adjunct Lecturer UNSW Australia. 

Research

Music Therapy

The aim of this research stream is to evaluate of the potential of Music therapy to bring joy to seniors. In particular to assess the effectiveness of the therapy for people living with dementia. I am also interested in benefits experienced by staff/carers offering the therapy and the families of older people.

 

This research is in collaboration with Moove & Groove www.mooveandgroove.com.au and also Uniting aged care.

https://www.mooveandgroove.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/ACU_Project_MGACTIVE_2019.pdf

 

Funding

Faculty of Health Sciences Research Project Grant Scheme (2020). A staff perspective on the effectiveness of headphone LISTENing therapy in aged-care facilities: $7,347.60 awarded to Dr Kirsten Challinor. Research Assistant: Layla Edwards.

 

Media

My research has received serious attention from the media in recent months including an article in the Australian and a front page masthead link to an article in the Sydney Morning Herald.

https://www.smh.com.au/national/real-tears-flow-as-families-zoom-in-for-an-easter-visit-20200403-p54gw2.html

https://www.australianageingagenda.com.au/technology/providers-roll-out-social-tech-for-residents

 

Conference presentations

Raymond, K., Challinor, K. L. (2019). A pilot testing if silent disco classes can improve the quality of relationship between persons with dementia and their carer’s. 18th National Conference of Emerging Researchers in Ageing, Sydney 4-5 Nov 2019. (Best poster award).

 

Searson, P., Challinor, K. L. (2019). Music therapy as a tool to reduce anger in older adults: a pilot study. 18th National Conference of Emerging Researchers in Ageing, Sydney 4-5 Nov 2019.

 

Simpson, L., Challinor, K. L. (2019). Efficacy of silent disco in decreasing depressive symptoms and improving independence in people with dementia: a pilot study. 18th National Conference of Emerging Researchers in Ageing, Sydney 4-5 Nov 2019.

 

Supervision of student Theses on Music Therapy 

Edrei Cullen supervised by Kirsten Challinor (2020). Evaluation of effectiveness of LISTEN program in aged care. Thesis TO BE submitted in fulfilment of Bachelor of Psychological Sciences (Honours) Australian Catholic University, Strathfield.

 

Brittany Crimmins supervised by Kirsten Challinor (2020). Online evaluation of staff experience of LISTEN programme in UNITING aged care. Thesis TO BE submitted in fulfilment of Bachelor of Psychological Sciences (Honours) Australian Catholic University, Strathfield.

 

Khiarn Raymond supervised by Kirsten Challinor (2019). A Feasibility Trial of Community-based Music Therapy Classes to Improve the Quality of Relationship Between Persons with Dementia and Their Carer’s. Thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of Bachelor of Psychological Sciences (Honours) Australian Catholic University, Strathfield.

 

Patrice Searson supervised by Kirsten Challinor (2019). Silent Disco as a Form of Exercise to Decrease Negative Affect of Older Adults: A Pilot Study. Thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of Bachelor of Psychological Sciences (Honours) Australian Catholic University, Strathfield.

 

Lana Simpson supervised by Kirsten Challinor (2019). Music to Your Ears: The Efficacy of Silent Disco in Reducing Risk Factors and Managing Symptoms of Dementia. Thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of Bachelor of Psychological Sciences (Honours) Australian Catholic University, Strathfield.

Vision & Food

In this research I investigate how vision influences our choice of food. As we are overexposed to high calorie/unhealthy food it is possible that we are adapting or habituating to such food and this, in turn, might affect our perception and valuation of subsequently-viewed food. Distortions or misperceptions in the way we see food could drive us to select certain foods over other healthier options. 

 

Journal article

Brooks, K. R., Mond, J., Mitchison, D., Stevenson, R. J., Challinor, K. L., & Stephen, I. D. (2020). Looking at the Figures: Visual Adaptation as a Mechanism for Body-Size and -Shape Misperception. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 15(1), 133–149. https://doi.org/10.1177/1745691619869331

 

Supervision of student student theses on Vision

Sophie Carse supervised by Kirsten Challinor (2020). Expanding the breadth of the nutritional claims model: calorie estimation and food labels. Thesis TO BE submitted in partial fulfilment of Bachelor of Psychological Sciences (Honours) Australian Catholic University, Strathfield.

 

Alex Vermeer supervised by Kirsten Challinor (2018). How your BMI changes your visual perception: The influence of Calorie Content on the Perceived Distance of Food. Submitted in partial fulfilment of Bachelor of Psychological Science (Honours) Australian Catholic University, Strathfield.

 

Monique Andreacchio supervised by Kirsten Challinor (2018). The Influence of Foodie Culture on Calorie Estimation. Submitted in partial fulfilment of Bachelor of Psychological Science (Honours) Australian Catholic University, Strathfield.

Education

ACU INSPIRE project: 2020
ACU (2020). INSPIRE: Initiative to Support the Integration of Research in Education. $ awarded to John Mahoney, Michael Noetel, Kirsten Challinor and David Barnett.

Optometry education 

This project is interested in measuring the effectiveness of continued professional development amongst vision specialists (optometrists). Understanding the knowledge, attitudes and practice of CPD & statistics.

Evidence based optometry
From 2011 to 2016, Kirsten worked at the School of Optometry and Vision Science at the University of New South Wales,  managing blended learning projects in Medicine- improving supervisor training: clinsupervisor.com. She led the adaptation of this content for Optometry Supervisors: clinsupervisor.com/optometry. Dr Challinor was a manager for a project improving the use of evidence-based practice in Optometry. See www.eboptometry.com


Journal article
Suttle, C. M., Challinor, K. L., Thompson, R. E., Pesudovs, K., Togher, L., Chiavaroli, N., … Jalbert, I. (2015). Attitudes and barriers to evidence-based practice in optometry educators. Optometry and Vision Science92(4). https://doi.org/10.1097/OPX.0000000000000550

 

Conference paper

Alkhawajah, S. M., Wei, K., Lee, J., Challinor, K. L. & Jalbert, I. (2020) Statistics–What do optometrists need to learn and understand? 

Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 61 (7), 5108-5108.

 

Supervision of student student theses on education

Sally Alkhawajah supervised by Isabelle Jalbert & Kirsten Challinor (2017-2020). Optometrists perspectives on CPD. Thesis TO BE submitted in fulfilment of PhD (Optometry) UNSW, Australia.

Autonomous Cars

The aim of this project is to measure the Australian public perception of blame in an automated vehicle crash with respect to who is blamed, what the public expect to happen as a result of the crash and how to prevent such crashes.

  

Journal article

Bennett, J. M., Challinor, K. L., Modesto, O., & Prabhakharan, P. (2020). Attribution of blame of crash causation across varying levels of vehicle automation. Safety Science (132), 104968.

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ssci.2020.104968

 

Academic conference

Bennett, J., Challinor, K. L., Modesto, O. & Prabhakharan, P. (2019). Blame of Crash Causation Across Varying Levels of Vehicle Automation. Australiasian Road Safety Conference, Adelaide, Australia, 25 September 2019 - 27 September 2019.

 

 

Supervision of student student thesis on autonomous cars

Roberto Ladewig Szenczuk supervised by Kirsten Challinor (2019-2020). Pedestrians and Automated Vehicles. Thesis TO BE submitted in partial fulfilment of Masters of Clinical Psychology, Australian Catholic University, Strathfield.